Pics for Craig


I spent some time in New England last week and was pleased that these pictures turned out well.

A pair of these are by the State House in Montpelier (click to embiggen).

“Steel Krupp Gun from the Spanish cruiser Castilla. Sunk by Dewey’s Squadron in Manila Bay May 1, 1898.”


Castilla was still in her peacetime colors of white and yellow and already having to be towed by Reina Cristina before the battle in Manila Bay. She was an easy target for American gunners and lasted a little over three hours in the battle before the abandon ship order was given.

Another trophy gun from the Castilla is located in Rochester, New York.

I don’t know anything about this piece other than I need to keep off.

Craig, what say you?

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4 Comments

Filed under Artillery, history

4 responses to “Pics for Craig

  1. ultimaratioregis

    ROAMY! When were you in Montpelier? I live 40 miles from there!! Those are two Krupp 15cm RK L/35 naval rifles that were aboard Castilla. They were the only semi-modern cannon aboard her, horizontal sliding block breech-loaders carried in four sponsons.

    The field gun is a replica 6-pounder from what I can tell, as served in the battle of Bennington. But I haven’t found anyone who can tell me much about the project.

    What a surprise to log on and see my state house cannon on the screen!!!

    • ultimaratioregis

      I should add that the same cannon, the Krupp RK L/35 15cm, stands in a mount across the street from the Naval Academy museum, except it is mated with a recoil mechanism, and a ballistic shield. I do believe that specimen was from Reina Christina.

    • I was in NH for business last week and made a side trip to Montpelier Tuesday morning. I had never been to Vermont before. I ate a delicious lunch at The Skinny Pancake. I wish I had had time for Burlington and Bennington, but I only had the morning.

      Post coming up later on my foray to Manchester and Concord, NH.

  2. I think the “keep off” cannon is a 3-pdr “Grasshopper” on a Civil War-era stock trail carriage. Sort of makes it look undersized.