Author Archives: ultimaratioregis

Op-For: “Where is the Case for Co – Ed Ground Combat?”

Indiana Guard Fires Historic Artillery Mission Adds M777 Digital Artillery Piece to Arsenal

Alte kamerad LTCOL P, Marine artilleryman extraordinaire, has a great piece about a great piece.   He points out some pretty sobering stats from the continuing effort to make ground combat a co-ed sport.

In the 155 mm Artillery Lift and Carry, a test simulating ordnance stowing, volunteers had to pick up a 95 lb. artillery round and carry it 50 meters in under 2 minutes. Noted the report, “Less than 1% of men, compared to 28.2% of women, could not complete the 155 mm artillery round lift and carry in the allotted time.” If trainees had to “shoulder the round and/or carry multiple rounds, the 28.2% failure rate would increase.”

As LTCOL P points out, such a test is in no way, shape, or form anywhere near realistic.  The HE M107 projectile is 95 pounds, a tad heavier with lifting eyebolt.  I would posit that making the test the moving of ten or twenty of those projectiles over, say, 100 meters, BEGINS to get to what kind of heavy manual labor is involved in being a field artilleryman.  I would doubt severely that any female tested could get anywhere close to passing that particular test.  And that is simply a beginning test.  Try it after several days of 3 hours’ sleep in the snow or in yesterday’s rainwater, or in the 115 degree heat, after displacing twice in four hours and digging in spades each time.

You can be guaranteed the feminists and their spineless apologists in uniform will continue to find ways to obfuscate and slant results such as these and continue to scream for she-warriors who are the physical equivalent of men, when they are not being helpless victims, of course.   Our present and future enemies must be awfully impressed.

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Ex-NYPD Officer Frank Serpico: Police Still Out of Control and Unaccountable

An excellent article in Politico Magazine.  Serpico has lots to say about the unaccountable, self-protecting, unionized, arbitrarily violent, up-gunned, over-armored, arrogant, power-mad police problem in our country.   Worth the read.  Here are some highlights.

Today the combination of an excess of deadly force and near-total lack of accountability is more dangerous than ever: Most cops today can pull out their weapons and fire without fear that anything will happen to them, even if they shoot someone wrongfully. All a police officer has to say is that he believes his life was in danger, and he’s typically absolved. What do you think that does to their psychology as they patrol the streets—this sense of invulnerability? The famous old saying still applies: Power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. (And we still don’t know how many of these incidents occur each year; even though Congress enacted the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act 20 years ago, requiring the Justice Department to produce an annual report on “the use of excessive force by law enforcement officers,” the reports were never issued.)

It wasn’t any surprise to me that, after Michael Brown was shot dead in Ferguson, officers instinctively lined up behind Darren Wilson, the cop who allegedly killed Brown. Officer Wilson may well have had cause to fire if Brown was attacking him, as some reports suggest, but it is also possible we will never know the full truth—whether, for example, it was really necessary for Wilson to shoot Brown at least six times, killing rather than just wounding him. As they always do, the police unions closed ranks also behind the officer in question. And the district attorney (who is often totally in bed with the police and needs their votes) and city power structure can almost always be counted on to stand behind the unions.

And an increasingly common malady, the appearance of an occupying army rather than that of protecting and serving:

Mind you, I don’t want to say that police shouldn’t protect themselves and have access to the best equipment. Police officers have the right to defend themselves with maximum force, in cases where, say, they are taking on a barricaded felon armed with an assault weapon. But when you are dealing every day with civilians walking the streets, and you bring in armored vehicles and automatic weapons, it’s all out of proportion. It makes you feel like you’re dealing with some kind of subversive enemy. The automatic weapons and bulletproof vest may protect the officer, but they also insulate him from the very society he’s sworn to protect. All that firepower and armor puts an even greater wall between the police and society, and solidifies that “us-versus-them” feeling.

Serpico also lays out some measures for getting at the root of the problem:

1. Strengthen the selection process and psychological screening process for police recruits. Police departments are simply a microcosm of the greater society. If your screening standards encourage corrupt and forceful tendencies, you will end up with a larger concentration of these types of individuals;

2. Provide ongoing, examples-based training and simulations. Not only telling but showing police officers how they are expected to behave and react is critical;

3. Require community involvement from police officers so they know the districts and the individuals they are policing. This will encourage empathy and understanding;

4. Enforce the laws against everyone, including police officers. When police officers do wrong, use those individuals as examples of what not to do – so that others know that this behavior will not be tolerated. And tell the police unions and detective endowment associations they need to keep their noses out of the justice system;

5. Support the good guys. Honest cops who tell the truth and behave in exemplary fashion should be honored, promoted and held up as strong positive examples of what it means to be a cop;

6. Last but not least, police cannot police themselves. Develop permanent, independent boards to review incidents of police corruption and brutality—and then fund them well and support them publicly. Only this can change a culture that has existed since the beginnings of the modern police department.

All in all, some fascinating insights.  From a cop whose moral courage is legendary.  What say we?

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…And God Made a Liberal

*Snort!*

H/T to Hilary, with one “L”.

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26 October 1942; The Battle of Santa Cruz

hornet santa cruz

In the far-flung Pacific Theater of the Second World War, there are some battles and events so momentous that it is immediately clear to the antagonists that their aftermath portends major shifts in the status quo; that conditions following will be forever different from what came before.  Midway is such an event.  With others, their true significance is often realized only in retrospect, as study of the results and decisions in the aftermath of those events is required to reveal how pivotal they truly were.  The Battle of Santa Cruz, which occurred seventy-two years ago today, is one of those largely hidden events.   A tactical and operational success for the Japanese, the battle was a pyrrhic victory for the Imperial Japanese Navy.

Powerful Japanese naval forces under Vice Admiral Nobutake Kondo had been tasked with supporting the efforts of the Japanese 17th Army in what was finally a major attempt to capture Guadalcanal’s Henderson Field and unhinge the position of the First Marine Division on that island.   The glacially slow and piecemeal reaction of General Hyukatake, commanding 17th Army, had allowed the Americans to build a force of more than 20,000, replete with a fully operational airfield and complete complement of supporting arms, by the time of the October counteroffensive. Even in October, Hyukatake badly underestimated US ground strength and fighting qualities, believing only some 7,500 garrisoned Guadalcanal.  The Japanese ground effort, including a combined tank-infantry attack, was once again poorly coordinated, and it came to grief against the lines of the First Marines and under the howitzers of the Eleventh Marines along the Matanikau River before either fleet engaged each other at Santa Cruz.  (Inexplicably, the Japanese Army units reported erroneously that they had captured Henderson Field when in reality they had nowhere threatened breakthrough of the Marine lines.)

At sea, Admiral Kondo’s force greatly outnumbered the Americans under Thomas Kinkaid. For the IJN, two large and two small carriers, six battleships, and ten heavy and light cruisers, with almost 250 aircraft significantly outweighed the two American fleet carriers (Enterprise and Hornet), the lone battleship (South Dakota), a half dozen cruisers, and around 170 aircraft.

Each fleet’s scout aircraft found the other almost simultaneously, and launched strikes simultaneously. In fact, the strike forces passed each other on their respective headings, with fighters from each side briefly and inconclusively engaging the enemy’s formations.   The Japanese air strikes exacted a heavy toll from the US ships.  Enterprise was struck with at least two bombs, jamming a flight deck elevator and causing extensive splinter and blast damage in the hangar decks, while near-misses stoved in her side plates.  Enterprise was seriously hurt, but somehow maintained flight operations.  Hornet was struck by three bombs and at least two torpedoes, wrecking her engine rooms and bringing the carrier to a halt.

hornettow.SantaCruz

Despite the heroic efforts to save Hornet, a well-placed torpedo from a Japanese submarine put paid to the effort.  The incident was eerily similar to the fate of Yorktown at Midway 4 1/2 months earlier.  Like her sister, Hornet stayed stubbornly afloat despite shells and torpedoes expended to scuttle her.   Eventually, the Japanese sank Hornet with two Long Lance torpedoes.  Battleship South Dakota was credited with shooting down 26 Japanese aircraft, but was struck on B Turret with a 550-pound bomb.  Additionally, two US destroyers were damaged.

In turn, the US Navy strikes crippled the light carrier Zuiho, wrecked the flight deck of Shokaku, and inflicted heavy damage with a bomb strike on heavy cruiser Chikuma.  The most consequential losses for the Japanese had been among the superbly trained veteran aircrews that had been the scourge of Allied pilots and surface vessels since Pearl Harbor.   Despite the fact that Kondo’s task force had inflicted considerably more damage to the American ships than Kinkaid’s flyers had managed, and despite the relatively even losses of aircraft (each side lost roughly the same percentage of aircraft to all causes), the loss of pilots and trained air crewmen was disproportionately heavy for the IJN.  US losses amounted to fewer than thirty aircrew, while the Japanese lost almost one hundred and fifty pilots and aircrew.   This represents a significantly greater loss than that suffered at Midway.   With a training pipeline that could not begin to replace such losses, the most fearsome weapon of the Kido Butai, its deadly naval air power, was blunted permanently.  Japanese carrier aviation was all but eliminated from the rest of the fight for the Solomons, and began a steady decline into oblivion that would culminate in the frightful massacre at the Philippine Sea twenty months later.

For Admiral Halsey at SOPAC, Santa Cruz could not have appeared to have been anything except another costly reverse.  In the preceding six months, the US Navy had lost Lexington at Coral Sea, Yorktown at Midway, Wasp off Guadalcanal in September, and now Hornet at Santa Cruz.  Not only that, but Saratoga had taken a torpedo in August and was stateside for repairs, and Enterprise was more heavily damaged in this battle than could be repaired at forward bases.   The IJN still outnumbered the US Navy in the Pacific in numbers of carriers and aircraft, and in surface combatants.  Additionally, after Santa Cruz, Kinkaid had retired with Nagumo on his heels.

Yet, despite the Japanese tactical victory, Santa Cruz represented the beginning of the end of the fearsome striking power which had wrecked the US Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor and had run amok for the six months that Yamamoto had predicted before December of 1941.  If the Americans did not realize it, at least Nagumo did.  He informed Naval Headquarters that without decisive victories, the industrial might of the United States would render the Japanese defeat in the Pacific inevitable.

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Hillary Clinton, Marxist-Leninist

From Breitbart.  Hillary was speaking yesterday evening at a fund raiser for far-left Democratic Senate candidate Martha Coakley.

If “corporations and businesses” aren’t the creators of jobs, that leaves but one entity to generate employment: The Government.  Precisely the Statist collectivism of Marx and Lenin.  Shared, by the way, with Saul Alinsky, the subject of so many gushing words of devotion from the very same Hillary Clinton when she was a young radical.  News flash:  Hillary is still that (now not so young) radical, having not tempered her far-left secular socialist-communist views one iota.   In this, she is entirely in lock-step with the current Administration, and its effeminate and anti-capitalist Alinskyite radical, Barack Obama.  And, if the government is the creator of jobs, rest assured that they will determine what jobs will be created, where they will be created, who will work those jobs (race/gender/religious/sexual preference quotas, anyone?), and what those workers will earn.  Immediately following will be regulations of where those workers live, what they buy, how and where they travel, how and if they vote…  all of which sounds familiar to adults of a certain age.

Given the means, she would make us into Iron Curtain Eastern Europe, replete with the suppression of freedom and government persecution which oppressed hundreds of millions and put to death more millions of victims for five decades.  But that will be okay, because THEY’RE in charge, and if their motives are noble, the suffering and privation of the bourgeoisie is a small price to pay.  But worry not.   You will need only to work for the collective according to your capabilities.  For which you will receive according to your need.

When you discuss Candidate Hillary as we approach 2016, do not be afraid to use the term “communist”.  She has told us she is precisely that.  As recently as last night.

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Crossfit!

From College Humor.

H/T Becky on FB

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The CDC and Enterovirus D68; Another Political Denial

enterovirus-3x5-092214-620x466

Pushed into the background with the outbreak of Ebola in Texas, and possibly Ohio, and other locations, is the stunning increase of the deadly Enterovirus D68.  The EV D68 is the illness that strikes with symptoms similar to polio, affecting children almost entirely.   Between 1970 and 2006, this virus was considered exceedingly rare.  In the 36 year study, only 26 cases had been reported in the United States, an average of just under one case per year.  In 2014, the number of cases has reached 691.  What has happened to cause an increase of more than 960% in this rare and potentially deadly pathogen?  Well, let’s see.  Barack Obama has allowed untold numbers of illegal immigrant children into our country, our cities and towns, our communities, and our schools.  Most are from Central America, an area where such diseases are relatively common.  The locations of these children have been kept from the American public.  How many children?  Thousands and tens of thousands.  Where are there clusters of EV D68 cases?  Kansas City.  Chicago.  Areas where significant numbers if illegal immigrant children have been moved.   What has the CDC to say in the matter?

“There is no evidence that unaccompanied children brought EV-D68 into the United States, we are not aware of any of these children testing positive for the virus”

The wording would lead one to assume that these many tens of thousands of illegal immigrant children were tested for EV D68.  Which is, of course, not the case.  It also might cause one to believe that the CDC has the slightest idea what diseases these illegal immigrants brought in with them.  Such as drug-resistant tuberculosis.  For which the CDC remained ominously silent.  While the medical staffs of the holding facilities were forced to be so.  The CDC, in reality, has no real idea what pathogens are crossing our borders, even if what they do know paints a grim and dangerous picture.

So one can take the “There is no evidence” claim by the CDC regarding EV D68 at face value, or one can fairly sensibly take into consideration the dismally inept performance of the CDC in handling the Ebola situation and unbroken track record of deliberate falsehoods promulgated by this Administration (F&F, IRS, Benghazi, Justice subpoenas, ISIS, etc.) and come to the reasonable conclusion that what the CDC means by “no evidence” is that “There is no evidence we would dare make public” regarding the explosion of the deadly enterovirus and any possible link to the wholesale dumping of illegal immigrant children into America’s cities and towns.    Much like the idea that restricting flights from ebola-affected countries in west Africa won’t do anything to reduce ebola cases in the US, but restricting the travel of US citizens possibly exposed, somehow would.
In essence, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have done precious little of either.  Instead, they have served as a quasi-legitimizing mouthpiece for Barack Obama’s far-left agenda (gun control) and his dangerously bankrupt policies and decisions.  However, the credibility of the organization, and its parent Health and Human Services (HHS), is at very low and still-sinking ebb (Obamacare, anyone?).  The ebola situation is just a part of that loss of credibility.  The alarming outbreak of enterovirus D68 is yet another.  It remains to be seen which will be more serious, more disruptive, or will kill and cripple more Americans.
While the President of the United States and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention cannot be held responsible for ensuring such outbreaks didn’t happen in the US, they sure as hell can be held responsible for ensuring that they did.

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