Category Archives: history

Ferguson: “Certain Instigators”

In this afternoon’s post, XBRAD applied the term “certain instigators” to define the thugs and race-baiters who wish for “black rage” and senseless violence in Ferguson rather than any acknowledgement of facts or desire for justice.   Those instigators have fanned the flames of racial hatred, demanded that due process be set aside so that revenge could be exacted, and assiduously masked the REAL issue of the Ferguson story: police overreach.   (No, I am not talking about the shooting death of Michael Brown.  Reaching for a policeman’s firearm in a wrestling match almost guarantees such an outcome.)  I am talking about law enforcement who treats every citizen as a suspect and potential perp.  Cops that sight in on unarmed civilians and scream that they are going to kill them.  Cops with little restraint, regardless of skin color of either the officer or the citizen.  Who might be eager to suppress that issue?  Our highest law enforcement official in the land.  And the President whose vision of government is one of omnipotence and intimidation.

The old saying, “You’re known by the company you keep”, certainly applies to those two.  Behold, the “certain instigators” of Ferguson:

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al and holder

Al-Sharpton-and-Obama

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Birds of a feather.  They have far more than skin color in common.  They are hucksters.  Bigoted, race-baiting charlatans.  Despicable and dishonest.  They see an opportunity for racial agitation in Ferguson, and in Wappinger Falls, NY, Durham, NC, Sanford, FL, but apparently none in Duncan, OK, or in South Salt Lake, UT, or Chicago’s projects.  And they are indistinguishable from one another, except that two of them are supposed to be supporting and defending the Constitution.

For people like Tim Scott, Alan West, Mia Love, and Dr. Benjamin Carson, skin color is the ONLY thing they have in common with those pictured above.   Something about content of their character, I believe.

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Filed under Around the web, history, obama, Politics, Uncategorized

SECDEF Fired: Hagel Goes Under the Bus

Chuck Hagel

Big news this morning that Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has been fired by President Obama.  Big news, but not surprising.  Hagel has openly contradicted the President several times, especially regarding the Administration’s rather childish assertions regarding the necessity of ground forces in the fight against ISIS.   You will hear various stories about how this was Hagel’s idea, and of course, the media will dutifully report as fact the White House’s version of events.  But that version will be as accurate and honest as WH proclamations on Benghazi, the IRS, Fast and Furious, ISIS intelligence failures, etc.

Though Hagel was not known as a deep thinker, the idea that he somehow couldn’t grasp the deeper and more complex defense issues smells like the intellectual elitism of the self-proclaimed far-left “ruling” class.  It is far more likely that Hagel attempted to keep Obama and his National Security Council grounded in reality, only to be poo-pooed and brushed aside by the overwhelming cacophony from the Marxist ideologues that have the President’s ample ears.   I was never a big Chuck Hagel fan, as he was a Global Zero guy whose viewpoints at various times bordered on the curious, but as SECDEF I thought he was one of the few at the top of the Defense structure with the spine to stand up to the rampant amateurish stupidity that emanated from 1600 Pennsylvania.  We could have done far worse.  We certainly might going forward.

Whether talks were “initiated” by Hagel or not, the nature of those talks were probably discussions about whether Obama was going to keep tossing aside wise counsel or not in favor of the childlike and naive rantings of his fellow-travelers.  And, the answer today seems to be a resounding YES.  Obama will continue to march forward in secular progressive lockstep to the Internationale, wreaking the concomitant damage on US security, foreign relations, and national power.

Funny that the Secretary of Defense that HE chose, to replace another that had had enough (Panetta), is now thought not to be up to the job.  One has to wonder who is.  Michele Flournoy has been mentioned, along with Ash Carter.  One has to think Bob Work is in the mix.  All are far too talented to want to serve out the last two years of the military train wreck that is the Defense Department under Obama.   It is like being hired to coach the Washington Generals, and being told you are expected to win.

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Filed under Afghanistan, Air Force, army, Around the web, budget, Defense, guns, history, iraq, islam, marines, navy, nuclear weapons, obama, Politics, Syria, Uncategorized, veterans, war

The Missile Men of North Vietnam

Sa-2camo

S-75 Dvina, known to NATO as the SA-2 Guideline, surface to air missile showing off it’s stationary ground launcher.

The SA-2 Guideline was the bane of existence for US aircrews in the skies over North Vietnam. Air and Space has a very interesting article on the Vietnamese crews that crewed these weapons 40 years ago:

Nguyen Van Pheit joined the North Vietnamese military in 1960. Five years later, as a young lieutenant, he was sent to the Soviet Union along with about 1,000 of his countrymen for SA-2 training. For nine months, they studied and drilled 14 hours a day, seven days a week, learning enough Russian that many became conversant with their instructors. The Soviets regularly served them bacon. Used to a Vietnamese diet rich in rice and vegetables, Phiet initially found the meat unappetizing, but he eventually got used to it. The culmination of his training was launching SA-2s at two unmanned aircraft. Phiet and his crew nailed both of the targets and toasted their hits with champagne.

After graduating from missile school, Phiet was deployed to Hoa Binh Province, southwest of Hanoi, to work on the city’s outer ring of air defense. Like the other SA-2s deployed to defend the North, the six missiles assigned to Phiet were arrayed in a rough circle on mobile, truck-towed launchers, with each missile positioned about a mile from its control and support vehicles.

A typical SA-2 battery relied on a truck-mounted Spoon Rest acquisition radar unit, which provided target location data to a rudimentary computer, and Fan Song guidance radar, which aided in missile guidance as well as target acquisition. To operate each SA-2, a minimum of five primary crewmen, in addition to maintenance and other support personnel, were required: three radar operators, one controller, and a battery commander.

Interesting reading from men who were on the receiving end of American airpower.

What's it feel like to get shot at and missed by a SAM? Ask those guys.

What’s it feel like to get shot at and missed by a SAM? Ask those guys.

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Filed under Air Force, history

The Landing Craft Infantry

Faced with the challenge of mounting a cross channel invasion from England to France, the US and Britain realized that small landing craft like the famed Higgins boat would be enough to land the very first assault echelons, but the need to very rapidly build up forces on the far shore would require something more substantial. The ideal craft would lift a reinforced rifle company, be capable of berthing and feeding them for about 48 hours, and be able to land them directly upon the far shore.  The result was the Landing Craft Infantry (Large).

The basic hull was 158 feet long, with a beam of 23 feet. Power was provided by two “Quad Pack” Detroit Diesel engines driving two shafts with reversible pitch propellers.  The Quad Pack was an interesting engine design. No diesel engine of suitable size and power was in production, so Detroit Diesel took four of their existing 6-71 engines, and coupled them to a shared driveshaft. The resulting 1704 cubic inch displacement engine would be used in multiple ships. The LCI(L) had a top speed of about 16 knots, and could maintain 15 knots. At a cruising speed of 8-10 knots, the ship had a range of about 4000 nautical miles, allowing it to self deploy from the US to Britain or to the distance Pacific. While it could self deploy, it could not embark troops for such a voyage.

Nine hundred twenty three LCI(L)s would be built in ten US yards. Two hundred eleven were transferred to the Royal Navy.  Over the course of the program, the design of the deckhouse and the internal arrangements were changed as a result of feedback from the fleet. Originally, two ramps one either side of the bow were used to disembark troops on the beach. First flight ships also had a low, square conning tower. Later ships had a higher, rounded “castle” conning tower with better visibility, and the final batches of ships replaced the ramps with a single ramp through double doors on the bow. These ships also had a larger deckhouse, allowing an increase in troop berthing from 180 to 210.

Original low deckhouse.

Modified deckhouse.

Bow ramp and full deckhouse.

The basic ship was also modified for a variety of roles, such as Flotilla leader, and most famously, gunboats.  The gunboat conversions were so successful that a further 130 ships were built specifically as gunboats, and known as the Landing Craft Support (Large).

Almost immediatley after the war, virtually the entire fleet of LCIs was decommissioned and disposed of. Most were scrapped, though a few were sent to foreign navies or bought by private parties. Today, there are a handful still around, including one in California, and one in Portland, Oregon, undergoing restoration to serve as a museum ship. And one of the volunteers at that example has produced a 42 minute guided tour of LCI-713.

The ship belongs to the non-profit Amphibious Forces Memorial Museum. The next time I head up there, I’m definitely going to have to visit.

Oh, and as an added bonus, there’s an operational 78’ PT boat in Portland as well. But we’ll save that for another post.

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Filed under history, navy

Don’t Worry Ladies, There’s Someone for Everyone….

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H/T Melissa N

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Filed under Around the web, girls, history, Humor, Uncategorized

The Gallant Hours

@GuadaBattle is still providing a timeline on twitter of the key events of the Guadalcanal campaign (and with the Marines birthday so near, it’s fitting to remember one of their mightiest campaigns).

Guadalcanal was truly a joint mission. Usually associated with the Marines by the general public, the campaign saw major contributions by the Army, Army Air Forces and titanic struggles by the Navy.

The 1960 film The Gallant Hours is a semi-documentary portrait of then Vice Admiral William F. “Bull” Halsey, who was appointed the theater commander in mid-campaign.  And youtube has it all for you.  You might want to bookmark this and watch it tonight or this weekend.

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“…In This, I Think, Is Glory.”

Still my favorite.

Happy Birthday, Marines!  Semper Fidelis!

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Filed under Defense, guns, history, marines, Personal, recruiting, Uncategorized, veterans, war, weapons