Category Archives: space

Tulsa Air and Space Museum

The Tulsa Air and Space Museum was a nice find.  A retired American Airlines MD-80 is parked outside, and an F-14 Tomcat is among the aircraft inside.

tulsa1

The museum pays homage to Oklahoma aviators and astronauts, including a large display about Wiley Post, Will Rogers, and their ill-fated flight in Alaska.  Another display described the last B-24 built at the Douglas plant in Tulsa, the “Tulsamerican”, which later went down in the Adriatic. Art deco pieces of the old airport building are preserved, as well as a couple of old Spartan airplanes. Oklahoma astronauts include Apollo 10 and Apollo-Soyuz commander Thomas Stafford, Skylab astronauts Owen Garriott and William Pogue, and Shuttle astronauts Shannon Lucid and John Herrington.

Mr. RFH liked this, the Jumo 004 turbojet engine for the Me-262.
Jumo

The kids liked the interactive displays and the knowledgeable docent.
mini me
back

Last but not least was the planetarium, which had a number of shows. I liked this display, an Eagle project made of a couple of thousand Rubik’s Cubes.
2000 rubiks

They also had up-to-date stargazer news, including the rendezvous with the Dawn mission to Ceres, the solar eclipse earlier in March, and updates on the James Webb Space Telescope.

On the same road, not far from the museum is Evelyn’s Soul Food Restaurant. This was a nice place to have lunch then return to the museum.

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Roamy roundup

Wednesday was the 50th anniversary of the first spacewalk. Alexei Leonov shares his thoughts.

Ed White would make the first American spacewalk on June 3, 1965 during the Gemini 4 mission. Both men had trouble with their helmets fogging up, which led to better cooling systems in future spacesuits.

Speaking of anniversaries, the 25th anniversary of the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope is next month. There is the NASA version of March Mania where you can vote for your favorite Hubble image. This telescope was designed to be serviced by astronauts, and still they had to repair items not meant to be monkeyed with in microgravity. One example is the imaging spectrograph, repaired during the last servicing mission. Goddard designed this fastener capture plate to hold the 111 fasteners (#4 and #8 size).
capture plate
Between Hubble and ISS, it is amazing what we can do with spacewalks.

If you ever want to fly an experiment on the International Space Station, NASA is creating researcher’s guides for each discipline.

I had posted the 5-segment booster test and thankfully didn’t repeat the public relations error about it being the most powerful booster test ever. NASAWatch sets the record straight with the Wikipedia entry for Aerojet’s motor firing of 5.88 million pounds thrust.

Between Sept. 25, 1965 and June 17, 1967, three static test firings were done. SL-1 was fired at night, and the flame was clearly visible from Miami 50 km away, producing over 3 million pounds of thrust. SL-2 was fired with similar success and relatively uneventful. SL-3, the third and what would be the final test rocket, used a partially submerged nozzle and produced 2,670,000 kgf thrust, making it the largest solid-fuel rocket ever.

And that is the Roamy roundup for today.

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Booster test today

Successful 5-segment booster firing in Utah earlier today.

**Tim Allen grunts “More Power!**

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He’s Dead, Jim. Leonard Nimoy, 83

leonard-nimoy-arena-4

Leonard Nimoy, the actor who played the iconic Star Trek character Spock, has died at age 83.  His was a remarkable life and career.  He appeared in countless television and movie roles, including in Combat, The Twilight Zone, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., and even Get Smart.  He narrated In Search Of, which was a great program.  He also had a sense of humor about himself, voicing his animated self on The Simpsons a couple of times.  Nimoy was also a Veteran, serving as a Sergeant in the US Army in the late 1950s.

He lived long, and he prospered.  RIP Spock.

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Filed under army, Around the web, history, ships, space, Uncategorized, veterans

Look out below!

A couple of interesting stories in the past few days. First, a 500-lb meteor believed to be from the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter entered the Earth’s atmosphere over western Pennsylvania. The fireball could be seen in Ohio, West Virginia, and New York as well. Meteorite fragments might be found around Kittanning, PA.

Second, Manuel Moreno-Ibàñez of the Institute of Space Studies (CSIC-IEEC) in Barcelona, Spain has a new model that predicts when meteors become fireballs and where meteorites may land.

Last but not least, Craig alerted me to the Spaceweather report of “the re-entry and breakup of a Chinese rocket body, specifically stage 3 of the CZ-4B rocket that launched the Yaogan Weixing 26 satellite in Dec. 2014.”

Photo taken by Donny Mott, Spirit Lake, Idaho.

Photo taken by Donny Mott, Spirit Lake, Idaho.

Looks like anything that survived re-entry landed in Canada.
wile

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Public Service Announcement

I’m guessing early half of 1990’s? Sinatra and Nelson sang together on the Duets II album in 1994, so I would think this was released around that time.

Thanks for the thumbs up, gentlemen.

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Retroactive Global Warming!

The Daily Telegraph has a none-too surprising article on how the climatologists have adjusted recorded readings to fit the Global Warming panic meme:

When future generations look back on the global-warming scare of the past 30 years, nothing will shock them more than the extent to which the official temperature records – on which the entire panic ultimately rested – were systematically “adjusted” to show the Earth as having warmed much more than the actual data justified.

…Paul Homewood, who, on his Notalotofpeopleknowthat blog, had checked the published temperature graphs for three weather stations in Paraguay against the temperatures that had originally been recorded. In each instance, the actual trend of 60 years of data had been dramatically reversed, so that a cooling trend was changed to one that showed a marked warming.

Nothing screams “scientific validity” like changing recorded results to fit a hypothesis.   When the bleeding-heart tree-huggers ask with such self-righteous indignation how we could possibly doubt “climate science”, you would do well to share information such as this with them.  And just who is leading the charge to re-write the weather data from yesteryear?  Why, it is the UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT.

Homewood checked a swath of other South American weather stations around the original three. In each case he found the same suspicious one-way “adjustments”. First these were made by the US government’s Global Historical Climate Network (GHCN). They were then amplified by two of the main official surface records, the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (Giss) and the National Climate Data Center (NCDC), which use the warming trends to estimate temperatures across the vast regions of the Earth where no measurements are taken.

Booker-graph-2_3175679a

GISS Raw Data

GISS "Adjusted" Data

GISS “Adjusted” Data

And it isn’t just South America.  Other “adjustments” have been made on existing and recorded data sets in other areas of the world.   Adjustments that is so severe that major climatic events are erased from the records.   Iceland faced severe economic impact from extreme cold weather from about 1965 to 1971, with a dramatic drop in agriculture and fishing.

…in nearly every case, the same one-way adjustments have been made, to show warming up to 1 degree C or more higher than was indicated by the data that was actually recorded. This has surprised no one more than Traust Jonsson, who was long in charge of climate research for the Iceland met office (and with whom Homewood has been in touch). Jonsson was amazed to see how the new version completely “disappears” Iceland’s “sea ice years” around 1970, when a period of extreme cooling almost devastated his country’s economy.

So there you have it.  According to the Global Warming panic mongers, the rather traumatic times of extreme cold, so indelibly etched on the memories of Icelanders, didn’t really happen.  It was instead, insists Global Warming alarmists, merely a recording error.

Note to tree-hugging liberals:  When you become outraged at our skepticism about “anthropogenic climate change”, and consider us to be “flat earthers” for not buying into the politically profitable nonsense that is man-caused global warming, try to understand why we think you are brainwashed and lemming-like nincompoops for pledging allegiance to anti-capitalist politicians whose “scientific methods” would not be accepted by a tenth-grade chemistry teacher.   The same politically-driven ideological crap “science” was once heaped upon me as a school boy when the dire prediction was of a coming ice age.   The solution to which was the same socialist wealth-redistribution malarkey that will now halt the fictitious Global Warming.

Here’s hoping your Prius gets stuck in a snow bank on the coldest day of the year.

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