Load HEAT- Kelly Stables

Spill recommended this week’s hottie, Kelly Stables. I’m not familiar with her, but at 4’11”, she’s probably the shortest LH we’ve ever featured.

Kelly_Stables (60)Kelly_stables_2_762_thumb_585x795Kelly_Stables_11_692_thumb_585x795Kelly_Stables-1_259_thumb_585x795Kelly Stables Spike TV Guys Choice 2013 Arrivals 9jfppNFQrnJlkelly-stablesKelly-Stables-Feet-81820kelly-stables-looking-you-hot-and-sexy-earrings-188019_thumb_585x795Kelly-Stables-picturekelly-stables-posing-cute-red-dress-188014_thumb_585x795kelly-stables-posing-front-flower-cute-stripe-dress-188017_thumb_585x795kelly-stables-posing-hot-blue-jeans-188011_thumb_585x795th

About these ads

2 Comments

Filed under Load Heat

U.S. Army EOD Soldier pulls grenade from man’s leg | Article | The United States Army

A U.S. Army Explosive Ordnance Disposal Soldier removed a grenade from a man’s leg in an ambulance outside of the University of Alabama Hospital here, Oct. 11.

Staff Sgt. David Mensink from the Fort Benning, Georgia-based 789th Explosive Ordnance Disposal Company received a call from the Birmingham Police Department Bomb Squad around 1 a.m.

The police sought Mensink’s advice to determine what kind of explosive item was stuck in the man’s leg.

“From the initial X-ray, it looked like a 40mm grenade,” said Mensink, a 27-year-old Iraq and Afghanistan veteran from Seale, Alabama.

via U.S. Army EOD Soldier pulls grenade from man’s leg | Article | The United States Army.

From the “I’m surprised it wasn’t Florida” files.

I didn’t know the Army had an EOD unit dedicated to support of civilian law enforcement, but it makes sense. There’s plenty of ordnance and duds laying around from the past couple hundred years. Having the experts on hand to help remove or neutralize it makes sense.

By the way, here’s the type of grenade in the article:

2 Comments

Filed under ARMY TRAINING

Pierre Sprey and the Fighter Mafia got it wrong.

In this post, I damned Pierre Sprey’s insights into the weapons development, particularly in aircraft.

Sprey was a part of the Fighter Mafia, alongside other notables, such as John Boyd, around whom something of a cult has formed. Indeed, your humble scribe is a member of a Facebook group devoted to Boyd and his theories.

But it is important to remember that while the Fighter Mafia had an outsized influence on the development of what would become the F-15, F-16, and eventually, the F/A-18, it’s even more important to remember that those three aircraft are all highly successful largely in spite of the Fighter Mafia, not because of them.

In the mid to late 1960s, appalled by the poor air to air combat record of the Air Force in Vietnam, the Fighter Mafia used Boyd’s E/M theory to argue successfully that the envisioned replacement for the F-4 Phantom should focus on maneuverability.

Eventually, that replacement became the F-15 Eagle, which, to be sure, is a highly maneuverable fighter. But the Fighter Mafia hated it. It’s a big, big fighter. Two primary factors led to its large size. First, fuel. For long range, you need a huge fuel fraction- that is, the percentage of gross take off weight dedicated to fuel. But the more fuel you carry, the more power you need to maintain performance and maneuverability. And of course, you get more power from bigger engines. Which need more fuel… The second factor driving the size of the Eagle was the radar. Radar range is largely a function of antenna array size. To achieve longer detection ranges, you need a larger array. The size of the antenna array ultimately has a large influence on the aerodynamic design of the rest of the aircraft. That is, a big radar results in a big airplane.

The Fighter Mafia also hated that the Eagle’s primary weapon was a quartet of AIM-7 Sparrow III missiles. To be sure, the Eagle also carried four AIM-9 Sidewinders, and an M61A1 20mm Vulcan cannon, in effect, the same armament as the late model F-4E it was to replace. The Fighter Mafia loathed the very idea of the Sparrow missile, with its heavy weight, required heavy radar, and the complexity and cost it imposed on the airplane. The rest of the Air Force, however, saw the Sparrow as the main battery, and the other weapons were just along for the ride, as they imposed a minimal penalty in weight and performance. The Eagle with its huge radar and beyond-visual-range, all aspect Sparrows would knock down MiGs long before the MiGs had a chance to maneuver against the Eagles. The Fighter Mafia did win some battles in the design of the Eagle- “Not a pound for Air to Ground” being one.

Overall the Eagle was the antithesis of what the Fighter Mafia sought in a new plane. They wanted, in effect, to out MiG-21 the MiG-21. They saw the perfect fighter as a lightweight, single engine plane armed with two Sidewinders, a cannon, and a simple radar along the lines of the APQ-153 for cueing the Sidewinders and gun-laying.

The Fighter Mafia also realized the cost of the Eagle would preclude the Air Force from buying nearly as many jets as they had F-4s to replace. And so, through some bureaucratic slight of hand, they convinced the DoD to open up a procurement program for what became the Lightweight Fighter (LWF) program.

Eventually, two prototypes would emerge from LWF, the General Dynamics YF-16, and the Northrop YF-17. At first glance, the Fighter Mafia would appear to have won. Both were small, very lightweight (well, compared to an Eagle), armed with Sidewinders and a gun, and with minimal radar.

Pierre Sprey did have a major influence at about this time. He was the driving force behind the competitive fly-off between the two prototypes.  At his insistence, the fly-off was conducted by operational test pilots, not engineering test pilots. That is, rather than pilots with a focus on ensuring the plane would meet some esoteric numerical data point, they wanted pilots who would evaluate the plane in terms of their experience with actual combat flying. Additionally, the test pilots would fly both types, giving them the opportunity to compare and contrast both. Both the objective data, and the subjective impressions of the pilots would influence the selection. In the end, the YF-16 won out.  The YF-17, after a major redesign effort, would be emerge as the F/A-18 Hornet now used by the Navy and Marine Corps.

While the YF-16 was almost exactly what the Fighter Mafia sought, the Air Force wasn’t entirely happy with it. Changes between the YF-16 and the production F-16A were extensive.

The Fighter Mafia saw the F-16 as the ne plus ultra of air to air combat. But the Air Force didn’t see much point to a second air to air fighter competing for budget dollars with the F-15 Eagle. What they did see a pressing need for was a light fighter bomber to replace hundreds of F-4 Phantoms, F-105 Thunderchiefs, and A-7D Corsairs. And so they gave the F-16 a significant air to ground capability. Additionally, advances in electronics and computing technology lead the Air Force to give the F-16 the APG-66  multi-function radar for both air and surface search, and air to air and air to ground weapons aiming. A few years later, the F-16C model began to enter service, and with it came the ability to use the AIM-120 Advanced Medium-Range Air to Air Missile, or AMRAAM. Where the Fighter Mafia envisioned an F-16 entering combat with no more external stores than a pair of Sidewinders, today an F-16 in combat typically carries two AMRAAMs, two Sidewinders, two to four Laser Guided Bombs, two 370 gallon drop tanks, and a jammer pod. To say the Fighting Falcon has strayed from the ideal of the Fighter Mafia is something of an understatement.

So where did the Fighter Mafia go wrong? They carefully analyzed the shortcomings of US airpower in air to air combat in Vietnam, and had a very plausible theory (E/M) that showed the way to overcome those failures.

The Fighter Mafia’s mistake was a failure to realize that many of the problems the US faced in Vietnam would be overcome by technology, much of it not directly related to the fighter aircraft themselves. Other issues were political or doctrinal, and would be overcome by training.

For instance, much of the bad reputation of the F-4 Phantom in combat was related to the early, all missile armed C and D models. Especially early in the war when they were equipped with the early AIM-7D model Sparrow, coupled with a requirement that all targets be visually identified, that poor air to air reputation was somewhat valid. But by the end of the Vietnam conflict, the vastly improved AIM-7E2 Sparrow was much more reliable, and a much better missile from a tactical point of view. Coupled with that technical improvement was early work on what we would today call Non-Cooperative Threat Recognition allowed US aircrews to begin using the Sparrow in the way it was intended, yielding much better results. Looking at the highest scoring ace of the Vietnam War, Chuck DeBellevue, we see that four of his six kills were with the radar guided Sparrow, and only two with the Sidewinder.

Similarly, the ability of airborne warning and control to definitively designate potential targets as hostile was on the cusp of being when the Fighter Mafia was arguing for a fighter that would, by design, be forced to merge to visual range with the enemy. The old EC-121 radar planes were being replaced by the vastly more capable E-3A Sentry.

Vastly improved training in air to air combat maneuvering also greatly changed the performance of US aircrews. Early failures in Vietnam were not merely a symptom of poor airframe design. Instead, prior to Vietnam, a very large percentage of the training time was spent on the tactical nuclear strike mission, as well as conventional air to ground training. Little thought was given to realistic air combat maneuvering. All these factors gave an unrealistic impression of the inability of the platforms such as the F-4 to succeed in the air superiority mission.

With continue improvement in missiles, in training, and in command and control measures allowing beyond visual range engagements, we’ve actually seen the virtual disappearance of the swirling dogfight the Fighter Mafia insisted the F-16 be built for. Looking at US Air Force air to air victories after Vietnam, the vast majority have been made with the long range Sparrow or the AMRAAM. Very few fights involved more than one sustained turn. Instead, the most common Eagle tactic is referred to as The Wall, with four Eagles line abreast using their powerful radars and Sparrows/AMRAAMs to sweep aside enemy fighters with “in your face” shots.

One of the prime drivers in the design of the F-22A Raptor was the need for very high, very fast flight because that high/fast combination gives a missile an even greater standoff range than one launched lower and slower.

And it is not just the US that increasingly saw that the long range standoff attack was the future. The Soviet MiG-29 and Su-27 were both primarily armed with the  R-27 (NATO reporting name AA-10 Alamo) and later the R-77 (NATO reporting name AA-12 Adder) long range radar guided missiles. European nations use either the AMRAAM or a variety of similar long range missiles. Had the F-16 become the Fighter Mafia wanted, it would be severely handicapped in the face of such BVR capable opponents.

It’s interesting that John Boyd, later famous for his OODA loop, would himself, as a member of the Fighter Mafia, arguably make a grave error in his own OODA loop in justifying his vision of the Lightweight Fighter.

OODA.Boyd

 

Having observed the poor air to air performance of the Air Force in Vietnam, his orientation led him to mistaken assumptions about what the future of air combat would look like.

8 Comments

Filed under Air Force, history

Sweden hunts damaged Russian sub: report – The Local

Swedish signals intelligence officials first heard an emergency call on Thursday evening, the newspaper said. Fourteen hours later, at around midday on Friday, a foreign vessel was spotted in the Stockholm archipelago.

Sweden intercepted further communications after it began its military operation in the waters off Stockholm, as encrypted messages were relayed between transmitters in the Stockholm archipelago and the Russian exclave Kaliningrad, SvD said.

The Swedish military said it could neither confirm nor deny the report.

An underwater craft in distress can be difficult to manoeuvre, which might explain why it was spotted above the waterline, the newspaper said.

A damaged submarine would need help from a support vessel, SvD said, adding that a Russian-owned oil tanker, the NS Concord, had been observed circling in international waters near Stockholm.

via Sweden hunts damaged Russian sub: report – The Local.

It’s hardly the first time the Russians have put subs deep in Swedish waters. The infamous 1981 Whiskey on the Rocks incident pops into my mind.

Coupled with recent aggressive Russian air patrols near Swedish territory, one suspects that the prime target here isn’t really so much Sweden as it is the Baltic states. Attempting to show an ability to operate with impunity near Sweden and the western powers is a means of cowing small nations such as Latvia.

2 Comments

Filed under ARMY TRAINING

The CDC and Enterovirus D68; Another Political Denial

enterovirus-3x5-092214-620x466

Pushed into the background with the outbreak of Ebola in Texas, and possibly Ohio, and other locations, is the stunning increase of the deadly Enterovirus D68.  The EV D68 is the illness that strikes with symptoms similar to polio, affecting children almost entirely.   Between 1970 and 2006, this virus was considered exceedingly rare.  In the 36 year study, only 26 cases had been reported in the United States, an average of just under one case per year.  In 2014, the number of cases has reached 691.  What has happened to cause an increase of more than 960% in this rare and potentially deadly pathogen?  Well, let’s see.  Barack Obama has allowed untold numbers of illegal immigrant children into our country, our cities and towns, our communities, and our schools.  Most are from Central America, an area where such diseases are relatively common.  The locations of these children have been kept from the American public.  How many children?  Thousands and tens of thousands.  Where are there clusters of EV D68 cases?  Kansas City.  Chicago.  Areas where significant numbers if illegal immigrant children have been moved.   What has the CDC to say in the matter?

“There is no evidence that unaccompanied children brought EV-D68 into the United States, we are not aware of any of these children testing positive for the virus”

The wording would lead one to assume that these many tens of thousands of illegal immigrant children were tested for EV D68.  Which is, of course, not the case.  It also might cause one to believe that the CDC has the slightest idea what diseases these illegal immigrants brought in with them.  Such as drug-resistant tuberculosis.  For which the CDC remained ominously silent.  While the medical staffs of the holding facilities were forced to be so.  The CDC, in reality, has no real idea what pathogens are crossing our borders, even if what they do know paints a grim and dangerous picture.

So one can take the “There is no evidence” claim by the CDC regarding EV D68 at face value, or one can fairly sensibly take into consideration the dismally inept performance of the CDC in handling the Ebola situation and unbroken track record of deliberate falsehoods promulgated by this Administration (F&F, IRS, Benghazi, Justice subpoenas, ISIS, etc.) and come to the reasonable conclusion that what the CDC means by “no evidence” is that “There is no evidence we would dare make public” regarding the explosion of the deadly enterovirus and any possible link to the wholesale dumping of illegal immigrant children into America’s cities and towns.    Much like the idea that restricting flights from ebola-affected countries in west Africa won’t do anything to reduce ebola cases in the US, but restricting the travel of US citizens possibly exposed, somehow would.
In essence, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have done precious little of either.  Instead, they have served as a quasi-legitimizing mouthpiece for Barack Obama’s far-left agenda (gun control) and his dangerously bankrupt policies and decisions.  However, the credibility of the organization, and its parent Health and Human Services (HHS), is at very low and still-sinking ebb (Obamacare, anyone?).  The ebola situation is just a part of that loss of credibility.  The alarming outbreak of enterovirus D68 is yet another.  It remains to be seen which will be more serious, more disruptive, or will kill and cripple more Americans.
While the President of the United States and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention cannot be held responsible for ensuring such outbreaks didn’t happen in the US, they sure as hell can be held responsible for ensuring that they did.

5 Comments

Filed under Around the web, Defense, history, obama, Politics, stupid, Uncategorized, weapons

Woot! XBradTC makes it to Twitchy!

An offhand comment to @ExJon makes it to Twitchy.

11 Comments

Filed under ARMY TRAINING

Instapundit » Blog Archive » JERRY POURNELLE: A New Ebola Czar; Military deploys to plague zone. Competence in government. “God…

Plus: “The rest of the article is worth your time. Five of the 58 medical professionals involved in the Science Magazine study died of Ebola before the paper was published. . . . Nine Doctors Without Borders physicians, all equipped with the best of isolation and prophylactic gear, have died of Ebola. Of the physicians and nurses who have died of Ebola in this epidemic, most (more than 60%) had what was considered more than adequate protective gear and were instructed in its use. The US Military being sent into the plague zone have had four hours of instruction.”

via Instapundit » Blog Archive » JERRY POURNELLE: A New Ebola Czar; Military deploys to plague zone. Competence in government. “God….

Emphasis mine.

Fifteen years ago, I’d have felt fairly comfortable with a four hour block of instruction.

First, usually monthly, but at least quarterly, I would undergo actual hands on training in donning personal protective equipment (PPE). More importantly, I’d also undergo hands on training in removing contaminated PPE, and decontamination procedures. To be sure, the contaminant in question was usually mustard gas or nerve agent, both of which can be treated. But the key was, don’t get contaminated doffing your gear.

But the past decade has seen the Army emphasis on training in nuclear, biological and chemical warfare environments wither. Not because the Army doesn’t see the need, but rather relatively low chance of needed to operate in NBC compared to the huge numbers of tasks that absolutely troops will be required to perform in a combat deployment. That means that both the average individual skill level and the institutional knowledge in avoiding contamination has faded.

Another key aspect of any successful training program is repetition. You don’t train until you get it right. You train until you can’t get it wrong. How many times will troops deploying to Liberia actually practice the techniques they need to master?

God bless them and keep them.

9 Comments

Filed under ARMY TRAINING