Tag Archives: china

Bring The HEAT Podcast

OK, I got the (most of) the technology figgered out. And a quick call with Spill actually generated some real content.

You can stream it here.

Or you can download the mp3 here.

(Right click and chose “Save Link As”)

If there’s sufficient interest, we’ll look at iTunes and Stitcher as well.

4 Comments

Filed under China, navy

DB: More on That Supposed Chinese-Authored Data Breach of OPM

WASHINGTON – Chinese hackers were behind a massive cyber-attack that among other things accessed the performance reviews of nearly three million shitty federal workers, Duffel Blog has learned.“Most damaging was not the utter failure of our 40 billion dollar cyber security program, or access to key government organizational structures,” said Eric Mickens, a spokesman for USCYBERCOM. “Most damaging is the fact that Chinese government now knows how terrible a number of U.S. government service (GS) civilians actually are.”The breadth of the attack which was originally detected in April was unknown until late last week. According to sources, it is believed that the Chinese intend to use the information gathered to discover the most common characteristics for the ideal spy to infiltrate the federal government. The sources went on to state that the Chinese government was now recruiting spies based on the profile of a 40 year-old non-combat, medically retired gunnery sergeant with poor communications skills, a non-existent work ethic and no real job prospects in the civilian world.Bob Paul, a retired Marine sergeant major who has been double dipping in a GS-10 job with no real function, is concerned that people will find out he has been leaving four hours early for the past two years. “Everyone at work knows I hit on the young interns all day and falsify my timesheets, but I am horrified that now the Chinese know that too,” Paul said.“Everyone is concerned here,” said Rick Walters of the Office of Personnel Management (OPM). “My boss is concerned because his only function is to spam everyone’s inbox with motivational emails, his boss is concerned because he actually thought his employees were working, and I am concerned because everyone now knows that I don’t really do anything.”Danielle Smith, a medically retired Air Force staff sergeant now doing who-knows-what at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, echoed many others’ sentiments. “I was medically retired for major depressive disorder due to the strain of my job. I earned the right to have a chill career with complete job security and no real purpose.”Still, Veterans Affairs Secretary Bob McDonald was upbeat when asked about the breach: “I think this is a positive development for the VA and especially me. I have received a lot of heat recently for the VA’s failures and I think now folks will begin to realize how shitty the talent I was working with actually was.”

The long term impact of this attack has yet to be understood, but in the short term it is clear China is using the information to its advantage. According to an anonymous source inside the Chinese government, the Chinese recently released over 3,000 workers imprisoned in gulags for poor job performance because the government realized that “maybe they are not that bad.”

2 Comments

Filed under ARMY TRAINING

Patrol Planes in the South China Sea

For years, there have been tensions between China and its neighbors in the South China Sea, particularly in the region of the Sprately Islands. There have also been tensions between the US and China over operations in the same region, among others.  The US recognizes no Chinese sovreignity over the disputed areas, and maintains its rights to freedom of navigation in the area. And to do so, they regularly exercise those rights, often via Maritime Patrol Aircraft such as the P-8A Poseidon. Recently, to show how this plays out, a US Navy P-8A brought along a CNN crew to show just what is involved.

China is unlikely to be so rash as to actually attack an American military aircraft. On the other hand, you don’t have to go too terribly far back into the Cold War to find incidents where they did just that, costing American lives.

 

Via Alert 5

6 Comments

Filed under China, navy

Your Weekend Reading Assignment- The ONI Assessment of the People’s Liberation Army Navy

The Office of Naval Intelligence has issued an assessment of the Chinese Navy (often referred to as PLAN) as well as its various Coast Guard type quasimilitary adjuncts.

Here’s some helpful graphics showing ship classes as well.

One more.

There’ll be a quiz shortly after Load HEAT on Monday.

H/T to Spill

1 Comment

Filed under China

CAIC WZ-10 in Pakistan

Recently China has provided the WZ-10 attack helicopter to Pakistan to help defend and police it’s Federally Administered Tribal Area (FATA).bThe WZ-10 is replacing the AH-1 Cobra attack helicopter operated by the Pakistani Army. Replacement has given us a first time opportunity to see the WZ-10 up close (photos courtesy of the China Defense Blog):

   

     

5 Comments

Filed under army, Defense, helicopters, war, weapons

PLA Navy tests new refueling pod for J-15 carrier fighter|Politics|News|WantChinaTimes.com

Having successfully copied the Russian-built UPAZ-1A aerial refueling pod, China’s PLA Navy can refuel a J-15 carrier-based fighter in midair in 5.3 minutes, the Moscow-based Center for Analysis of Strategies and Technologies said on Jan. 22.

via PLA Navy tests new refueling pod for J-15 carrier fighter|Politics|News|WantChinaTimes.com.

Spill’s on a bit of an air-to-air refueling history kick right now, so I thought I’d share this. Carrier aircraft almost inevitably use probe and drogue refueling. Our land based friends tend to use boom and receptacle, because it was designed for large bomber type aircraft. Booms also have much higher fuel transfer rates. But they require a large dedicated tanker, such as the KC-135. Obviously, you can’t fit one of those on a carrier. So probe and drogue it is.

There’s primarily two types of tanking in naval air, mission tanking, and recovery tanking. Mission tanking is used to extend the endurance or range of strike aircraft for a given mission. Recovery tanking is simply topping off returning aircraft to give them more time to land aboard ship, for instance, if the recovery is delayed by a foul deck or the pilot is having his turn in the barrel and repeatedly boltering (failing to arrest during his landing).

The US Navy used to have dedicated KA-3B and KA-6D tankers in its air wings, which carried sufficient fuel to perform both tanking missions pretty well. Today, the tankers of the air wing are simply F/A-18 E and F SuperHornets that have a buddy refueling pod slapped on. The long, long flights required to support operations in Afghanistan, Iraq and a few other places also means the Navy has increasingly had to rely on tanker support from the Air Force for mission tanking. KC-135s have an adapter to put a basket on the end of their boom.

Tanking is, like landing upon a carrier, one of those incredibly difficult feats of airmanship that naval aviators simply must become proficient in as a matter of routine, or they are useless to the fleet.

For the Chinese, this is especially so. The ski-jump take off they use on their carrier greatly limits the gross weight a fighter can take off with. If the fighter is going to carry a useful load of weapons, that means much less than full fuel can be carried. Hence the need for a refueling pod. Just how much one J-15 (essentially a Chinese carrier capable version of the Russian Su-33) can transfer is an open question. But a little bit of giveaway fuel is a whole lot better than none.

An UPAZ-1A aerial refueling pod on a Russian Su-24 fighter bomber. (Internet photo)

UPAZ-1A Refueling pod under Russian Su-24. Presumably the Chinese derivative is similar in appearance.

Comments Off on PLA Navy tests new refueling pod for J-15 carrier fighter|Politics|News|WantChinaTimes.com

Filed under navy

The Real Military Threat from China: Anti-Ship Cruise Missiles | The National Interest

“Air-Sea Battle” with Chinese Characteristics: a large fleet of land-based aircraft armed with some of the world’s most advanced anti-ship cruise missiles.

Lyle J. Goldstein

January 22, 2015

 

During the 1982 Falklands War, Argentina possessed a measly total of five Exocet anti-ship cruise missiles with which to face down the Royal Navy in the South Atlantic. Had that number been more like 50 or 100, that conflict might well have had a very different ending. This important lesson has not been lost on China’s military chiefs. Indeed, China has placed great emphasis on anti-ship cruise missile (ASCM) development over the last three decades and is now set to reap the strategic benefits of this singular focus.

via The Real Military Threat from China: Anti-Ship Cruise Missiles | The National Interest.

Mr. Goldstein is indeed correct that large inventory of Chinese ASCM present a greater threat to US surface fleets in the Western Pacific than probably any other single Chinese weapon system.

But his analysis is too focused on the arrows in the quiver, and not enough on the eye of the Archer.

The huge numbers of cruise missiles are useless if rather precise information is lacking on the location, course, and speed of the intended target. And for all of China’s impressive improvements in maritime strike capability over the last three decades, their investments in maritime patrol aircraft and other targeting systems seem decidedly lacking.

To be sure, to influence the course of events ashore, a power projection navy such as ours must eventually close the coast, coming within easy sensor range of an enemy. But the great virtue of seapower here is the initiative to choose the time and place for such strikes.

That’s not to say the US Navy should simply assume it can easily better the Chinese. It shouldn’t. But it is a caution to the reader to not magnify the threat beyond all reason.

5 Comments

Filed under China, navy